Museen und Twitter im deutschsprachigen Raum

Einige Funde, geordnet nach der Zahl der Follower (Stand: jetzt). Spamfollower z.B. beim Kindermuseum Wien wurden mitgezählt.

Mercedes-Benz-Museum 680
http://twitter.com/MB_Museum

Schuhmuseum Salzbergen (in Planung) 513
http://twitter.com/schuhmuseum

Städel Museum Frankfurt 387
http://m.twitter.com/staedelmuseum

Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt 263
http://twitter.com/SCHIRN

Museum Villa Stuck München 233
http://twitter.com/villastuck

Buchstabenmuseum eV 231
http://twitter.com/BMeV

Müritzeum (eher Zoo) 182
http://twitter.com/mueritzeum

Kunstverein Wiesbaden 121
https://twitter.com/kunstverein

Eishockeymuseum 90
http://twitter.com/eishockeymuseum

Liebighaus Frankfurt 83
http://twitter.com/Liebieghaus

THE KENNEDYS Berlin 63
http://twitter.com/THE_KENNEDYS

Haus der Musik Wien 48
http://twitter.com/hausdermusik

Kunstmuseum Stuttgart 47
http://twitter.com/kunstmuseum

Sisi-Museum Wien 33
http://twitter.com/hofburg_vienna

DDR-Museum Berlin 28
https://twitter.com/ddrmuseum

Kindermuseum Wien 21
http://twitter.com/kindermuseum

Hofmobiliendepot Wien 13
http://twitter.com/moebel_museum

Marta Herford 7
http://twitter.com/martamuseum

***

Verwandtes

Jörn Brunotte, Museumsberater 805
http://twitter.com/jbrunotte

Museumsportal Berlin 469
http://twitter.com/museumsportal

Museumsverband BRB 6
http://twitter.com/MV_BRB

Ergänzungen gern in den Kommentaren!

Update: 23.6.2009

Heimatmuseum Falkensee (Brandenburg)
http://twitter.com/museumfalkensee

Update 22.7.2009

Lehmbruck-Museum Duisburg
http://twitter.com/LehmbruckMuseum

Alamannenmuseum Ellwangen
http://twitter.com/alamannenmuseum
Nachtrag aus den Kommentaren

Update 2.9.2009
Museum Weltkulturen Frankfurt am Main
http://www.twitter.com/weltkulturenffm

Update:

Museums on Twitter July 09
http://www.museummarketing.co.uk/?p=171&cpage=1

Association of Research Libraries (ARL) fordert: keine Geheimhaltungs- oder Vertraulichkeitsklauseln in Lizenzverträgen akzeptieren! Elsevier-Intervention bleibt erfolglos

For immediate release:
June 5, 2009

For more information, contact:
Julia Blixrud
Association of Research Libraries
202-296-2296
jblix@arl.org
ARL Encourages Members to Refrain from Signing Nondisclosure or Confidentiality Clauses

Members Also Encouraged to Share Agreement Content

Washington DC—The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Board of Directors voted in support of a resolution introduced by its Scholarly Communication Steering Committee to strongly encourage ARL member libraries to refrain from signing agreements with publishers or vendors, either individually or through consortia, that include nondisclosure or confidentiality clauses. In addition, the Board encourages ARL members to share upon request from other libraries information contained in these agreements (save for trade secrets or proprietary technical details) for licensing content, licensing software or other tools, and for digitization contracts with third-party vendors.

The Board adopted this position at the ARL Membership Meeting in Houston, Texas, on May 22. The resolution was prepared in response to the concerns of membership that, as the amount of licensed content has increased, especially through packages of publications, nondisclosure or confidentiality clauses have had a negative impact on effective negotiations. The Scholarly Communication Steering Committee took the position that an open market will result in better licensing terms. In their discussions, the committee also noted the value of encouraging research projects and other efforts to gather information about the current market and licensing terms, such as an initiative being undertaken by Ted Bergstrom, University of California, Santa Barbara, Paul Courant, University of Michigan, and Preston McAfee, Cal Tech, to acquire information on bundled site-license contracts. A panel session on collaboration held later in the Membership Meeting included informal polls of members and the results indicated high levels of agreement and a positive commitment for making this information public when possible.

“Openness, transparency, and collaborative action have been the hallmarks of the library profession and the scholarly community,” said Jim Neal, Columbia University, and Chair of the ARL Scholarly Communication Steering Committee. “It is incumbent upon us to share information about these major contracts we are signing on behalf of our library users.”

“While research libraries may have in the past tolerated these clauses in order to achieve a lower cost,” acknowledged Charles B. Lowry, ARL Executive Director, “the current economic crisis marks a fundamentally different circumstance in the relationship between libraries, publishers, and other vendors.” ARL will be establishing a mechanism by which its members can share information with one another about their agreements.

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 123 research libraries in North America. Its mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. ARL is on the Web at http://www.arl.org.

P.S.: Über die Mailingliste der ARL-Bibliotheksdirektoren ging am Freitag die Nachricht, dass der Whitman County Superior Court einen Antrag auf einstweilige Verfügung von Elsevier abgelehnt hat, mit dem der Verlag der Washington State University untersagen wollte, einem Public Records Request zu entsprechen, den Ted Bergstrom, Paul Courant und Preston McAfee zum Lizenzvertrag von Elsevier mit WSU gestellt hatten. Elsevier sah „confidentiality of its proprietary pricing methods and formulae“ verletzt, das Gericht hat „Full Disclosure“ verfügt.

Update 24. Juni: Julia Blixrud hat mir soeben die offizielle Pressemitteilung geschickt:

Elsevier Motion to Block License Release Denied in Open-Records Decision
Full Disclosure of Public Records Favored in Washington State
For immediate release:
June 23, 2009

For more information, contact:
Julia C. Blixrud
Association of Research Libraries
202-296-2296
jblix@arl.org

Elsevier Motion to Block License Release Denied in Open-Records Decision

Full Disclosure of Public Records Favored in Washington State

Washington DC–An injunction filed by Elsevier to block release of information included in a licensing contract between the publisher and Washington State University (WSU) was denied by a court in the state of Washington last week. A public-records request for contract terms had been submitted to the university by researchers gathering data on the terms of large-publisher bundled contracts.

Whitman County Superior Court, State of Washington, ruled Friday, June 19, 2009, in favor of full disclosure for a public-records request submitted to Washington State University by Ted Bergstrom, Paul Courant, and Preston McAfee for license information regarding the WSU-Elsevier contract. On June 9, Elsevier had filed a Motion for Injunction against release of the data. According to court papers, the plaintiff argued that disclosure of the Elsevier-WSU contracts would „disclose aspects of Elsevier’s pricing methods and formula so as to produce private gain and public loss. Such disclosure would violate Elsevier’s rights under Washington statutes…to preserve the confidentiality of its proprietary pricing methods and formulae.“

„We could see no reason why the open-records request should not be fulfilled in this case,“ said Jay Starratt, Dean of Libraries, Washington State University. „As a member of ARL’s Scholarly Communication Committee, I am interested in the results of the data analysis being conducted by the researchers.“

Researchers Ted Bergstrom, Professor of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, and Paul Courant, University Librarian, Dean of Libraries, and Professor of Public Policy, Economics, and Information, University of Michigan, said, „We believe that state open-access laws serve the public interest by requiring full transparency of contracts that involve millions of taxpayer dollars. We will continue to collect and analyze the terms of ‚Big Deal‘ contracts signed by a large number of universities and to share this information with the library community. We appreciate the efforts of university librarians who have helped us to collect contract information and we are grateful for ARL’s support and encouragement.“

It is not enough for institutions to assume that public-records requests will ensure that information about contracts and licenses can be made publicly accessible. Last month, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Board of Directors supported a resolution to encourage its members to refrain from signing nondisclosure agreements with publishers and to share information about their agreements, insofar as possible, with each other. Tom Leonard, President of ARL and University Librarian, University of California, Berkeley, said, „By responding to an open-records case in this manner, Elsevier has only increased our resolve to push for both open contracts and public disclosure of terms in our negotiations. This case is a telling example of why we should not be signing these nondisclosure agreements.“

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 123 research libraries in North America. Its mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. ARL is on the Web at http://www.arl.org.

Association of Research Libraries
21 Dupont Circle NW, Suite 800 | Washington DC 20036 | 202-296-2296
http://www.arl.org

Chronikhandschrift des Matthias von Kemnat online

http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/codheidnf9

Zur 1997 von der Uni Heidelberg erworbenen Handschrift der Sammlung Ludwig (danach Malibu) siehe

http://www.handschriftencensus.de/21636

Teilausgabe des überlieferten Textes:

http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/hofmann1862

Mein NDB-Artikel über den Autor:
http://mdz10.bib-bvb.de/~db/0001/bsb00016334/images/index.html?seite=424

Update:

Auch Heid. Hs. 3599 des gleichen Werks ist online

http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/heidhs3599

Dümmer gehts nimmer: Willy Wimmer (CDU) zu Google StreetView

http://www.rp-online.de/public/article/meerbusch/721660/Googles-Blick-in-die-Intimsphaere.html

Natürlich ist das eine Verletzung der Intimsphäre. Ich war selbst bass erstaunt, als ich den Kamerawagen in meinem Heimatort Jüchen gesehen habe.

Wer nicht weiß, dass im Vorüberfahren straßenseitig aufgenommene Hausansichten nicht das geringste mit Intimsphäre zu tun haben, hat sich offensichtlich bewusst entschlossen, die Öffentlichkeit irrezuführen.

?s=streetview

Axel Mauruszat CC-BY

Österreichischer FWF und Open Access

http://www.egms.de/de/journals/mbi/2009-9/mbi000139.shtml

GMS Medizin – Bibliothek – Information.
Zeitschrift der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für medizinisches Bibliothekswesen

Repositorien: Der grüne Weg zu Open Access Publishing aus der Perspektive einer Forschungsförderungsorganisation: 10 Fragen von Bruno Bauer an Falk Reckling, Mitarbeiter des FWF Der Wissenschaftsfonds

Zitat:

Wenn sich das bisherige Publikationssystem der Zeitschriftenabonnements und -lizenzen bewährt hätte, dann wäre es schwer verständlich, wie es zur „Zeitschriftenkrise“ und auch zur Open Access Bewegung gekommen ist. Die Open Access Bewegung ist ja keine Erfindung der Wissenschaftsbürokratie, sondern hat sich aus dem vitalen Bedürfnis der Scientific Community gespeist, auf Forschungsergebnisse, die von ihr produziert wurden, auch freien Zugang zu haben (Hierzu kann ich nur empfehlen, was der Medizinnobelpreisträger Harold Varmus als Wissenschaftler wie als NIH-Chef dazu geschrieben hat [1]).
Des weiteren sehe ich prinzipiell wie auch empirisch keine Anzeichen dafür, dass sich das bisherige System in Fragen der Qualität, des Impacts oder der Finanzierung von dem des Open Access unterscheidet:
Zunächst gibt auch im alten System in diesen Punkten eine erhebliche Varianz. Ein Aspekt der Zeitschriftenkrise war ja, dass es – wie die Gebrüder Bergstrom mit der Datenbank http://www.journalprices.com zeigen – bei vielen Zeitschriften kaum eine positive Korrelation zwischen Impactleistung und Preis gibt.
Open Access Publikationen unterliegen genau den gleichen „Gesetzen“ wie jede neue Zeitschrift im alten System: es braucht Zeit bis die entsprechende Reputation aufgebaut ist.
Wenn man bedenkt, dass Open Access (Green wie Gold Road) systematisch erst seit einigen Jahren betrieben wird, dann ist erstaunlich, in welchem Ausmaß Qualität und Impact sich bereits entwickelt haben. Damit meine ich nicht nur „Flaggschiffe“ wie die Zeitschriften von PLOS. Für viele Disziplinen gibt es mittlerweile einige empirische Evidenzen, dass Open Access signifikant den Impact der Publikationen erhöhen kann (siehe u.a. http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html).
Aber zurück zu den Beweggründen des FWF. Es gibt im Wesentlichen drei Gründe: (1) Öffentlich finanzierte Forschung ist geradezu verpflichtet, die Produkte des öffentlichen Gutes „Wissenschaft“ so weit als möglich frei und kostengünstig zugänglich zu machen. (2) Weiterhin ist es im Interesse jeder Förderorganisation, dass die Ergebnisse ihrer Förderungen eine möglichst große Verbreitung finden. (3) Und schließlich gibt auch eine ökonomische Verantwortung. Derzeit konzentriert sich der STM-Markt auf drei bis vier marktbeherrschende „Big Player“, und das bei einem Markt, bei dem ein Großteil der Produktkosten und Abnahme von öffentlichen Mitteln getragen, die Gewinne aber privatisiert werden. Hier bietet Open Access die Möglichkeit, den Wettbewerb um Publikationsmodelle wieder zu vitalisieren, indem es profitorientierten wie auch nicht-profitorientierten Alternativmodellen Marktzugangschancen eröffnet.

Büchervernichtung in Afghanistan

http://www.freitag.de/kultur/0924-afghanistan-buechervernichtung (via http://log.netbib.de )

Vor 1.400 Jahren, als arabische Muslime zum ersten Mal in das von Persern bewohnte Gebiet einfielen, stießen sie auf eine eindrucksvolle Bibliothek, die unter dem Namen Jundi Shpur bekannt ist. Sie war die größte ihrer Art und befand sich in der größten Bibliothek jener Zeit. Der Kommandeur der arabischen Truppen, Sa’ad Ibn Abi Waqas, wandte sich in einem Brief an seinen Vorgesetzten und fragte ihn, was mit den Büchern geschehen solle. Die Antwort lautete, er möge überprüfen, ob der Inhalt der Bücher mit dem Koran übereinstimme. Stimme er überein, seien die Bücher überflüssig, denn der Koran sei ja bereits überall erhältlich und allgemein zugänglich. Hätten die Bücher nichts mit dem Koran zu tun, seien sie ohnehin nutzlos. Also ließ der Kommandeur die Bibliothek mitsamt den Büchern niederbrennen.

Vergangene Woche ließ die afghanische Regierung zehntausende von Büchern in einen Fluss werfen.

G. Doré http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Datei:Paulus_Bücherverbrennung.jpg

Literaturhinweise: Forschungsdaten

Donnelly, M.; Jones, S.: Data Management Plan Content Checklist. Draft Template for Public Consultation. 2009. Online.
http://www.dcc.ac.uk/docs/templates/DMP_checklist.pdf

Green, A. et al.: Policy-making for Research Data in Repositories: A Guide. Version 1.2. 2009. Online.
http://www.disc-uk.org/docs/guide.pdf

Green, T.: We Need Publishing Standards for Data sets and Data Tables. OECD Publishing White Paper. 2009. Online.
http://ocde.p4.siteinternet.com/publications/doifiles/publishing-standards-data-2009.pdf

Klump, J.: Digitale Forschungsdaten. In: Neuroth, H. et al.: Nestor Handbuch. Version 2.0. 2009. Online.
http://nestor.sub.uni-goettingen.de/handbuch/artikel.php?id=72

Sietmann, R.: Rip. Mix. Publish. Der Wissenschaft steht ein radikaler Wandel im Umgang mit Forschungsdaten bevor. In: c’t 14/09, S. 154-161.

UK Data Archive: Managing and sharing data. A best practice guide for researchers. 2009. Online.
http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/news/publications/managingsharing.pdf

Quelle: Helmholtz-Open-Access-Newsletter
http://oa.helmholtz.de/index.php?id=252#c1339