Blogging about legal history

Otto Vervaart has a nice passage on Archivalia in its blog entry “Crossing many borders: the study of medieval canon law”

http://rechtsgeschiedenis.wordpress.com/2012/08/22/crossing-many-borders-the-study-o-medieval-canon-law

In my blog roll I try to present as many relevant blogs for legal history as I can. My collection is surely not complete. Returning briefly to the opening of this post where I told about the impulse I received from Germany in 2009 it is only quite recent that German scholars have started embracing this medium. Klaus Graf is probably the best known pioneer, if not the very godfather of German history blogs. He started his Archivalia blog in 2003. The German branch of the French Hypotheses blogging network was officially launched during a symposium Weblogs in den Geisteswissenschaften in Munich on March 9, 2012. At http://de.hypotheses.org you can now find 23 German scholarly blogs, including a new one edited by Klaus Graf with references to reviews of recent studies on Early Modern history, the Frühneuzeit-Blog der RWTH. Graf wrote a very substantial paper for this meeting, with many links to blogs instead of traditional German footnotes. It is no incident that the Deutsches Historisches Institut in Paris and its librarian Mareike König have taken a lead in getting German scholars to create blogs and to use Twitter.


Autor: Klaus Graf

Historiker und Archivar, Blogger

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Diese Website verwendet Akismet, um Spam zu reduzieren. Erfahre mehr darüber, wie deine Kommentardaten verarbeitet werden.