Uploading E-Books to the Internet Archive

There are now 400 books posted on the e-Books website
http://www.athelstane.co.uk

[…]

I have recently started a project to upload the scans in PDF form of
many of the above books to the Internet Archive. The main purpose is to
clear the path so that people from all over the world can upload their
scans, and was suggested to me by Brewster Kahle. He calls it a
Grassroots Book-Scanning enterprise. I am doing a pilot study, with
twenty-one books in Stage One, and a further fifty in Stage Two. All the
problems should be ironed out by the time this is complete in a few
weeks from now. I am working on a manual to advise people wanting to get
involved. After that a further hundred books will be prepared, put onto
a DVD, and possibly posted for me directly at Internet Archive. There
will be many more to follow after that. You can review progress on this
project by using
http://www.athelstane.co.uk/iarchive.htm

In addition to the PDF I have posted an HTML file for each entire book,
and a TEXT file that can be used to make an audiobook. The spelling in
the latter has been converted to the American style (some of the posted
books have not been done yet). There is also in each book’s folder a
small text file that explains how easy it is to make a good audiobook,
with a recommendation that people should use TextAloud MP3 available
from http://www.NextUp.com whence you can also get the highly recommended
voices from Acapela. These are of course once-off purchases, and after
that you can make the audiobooks for free, except for the small cost of
storing them on CDs. The technology also works for most novels on
Project Gutenberg. There is a very easy process available within
TextAloud for splitting the book into chapter files, correctly named,
and from this creating a set of MP3 files for the book, one for each
chapter.

Wishing everyone a happy Christmas and New Year,
Nick Hodson, London, England, United Kingdom
—————————————————————————–
This message was sent via the Book People mailing list.


Autor: Klaus Graf

Historiker und Archivar, Blogger

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht.

Diese Website verwendet Akismet, um Spam zu reduzieren. Erfahre mehr darüber, wie deine Kommentardaten verarbeitet werden.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search