Inventar Fürsten von der Leyen

Es steht noch nicht auf http://www.landeshauptarchiv.de, ist aber schon erschienen: Inventar der Akten und Amtsbücher des Archivs der Fürsten von der Leyen im Landeshauptarchiv Koblenz (2004), bearb. von Anja Ostrowitzki. XIX, 586 S. (Veröff. LAVRP 102)

Ergänzend sei darauf aufmerksam gemacht, dass zu den Hohengeroldsecker Akten Leyenscher Provenienz eine Spezialuntersuchung vorliegt, die auch online einsehbar gewesen wäre, vgl.
http://archiv.twoday.net/stories/104752

US: Copyright in Government Publications

http://www.dtic.mil/cendi/publications/04-8copyright.html

„The always-useful beSpacific blog has a posting on a new FAQ on copyright produced by CENDI, the interagency working group of senior Scientific and Technical Information managers from 12 U.S. federal agencies.

The FAQ is focused on issues relating to copyright in a government setting, and it is excellent. It includes discussion of when government works are copyrighted, what happens when government works are included in other publications, and the copyright status of work produced by Federal contracts and grants. It also has a very useful copyright glossary, and links to many of the copyright notice and permission pages from different federal agencies. And it doesn’t avoid taking opinions. Highly recommended.“

http://blog.librarylaw.com/librarylaw/2004/09/copyright_in_go.html

See also the comments

UK: More than 8000 latin charters in fulltext

http://www.utoronto.ca/deeds/research/research.html

„An important new online resource that’s recently become available is DEEDS [Michael Gervers, University of Toronto] – a collection of the Latin texts of more than 8000 charters extracted from 170 published cartularies, mainly from the 12th and 13th centuries. The original emphasis was on Essex (the acronym stands for Documents of Essex England Data Set), but the collection also covers other parts of England and Wales. The largest numbers of charters come from Lincoln Cathedral, the Order of the Knights of the Hospital of St John, and the abbeys of Oseney, Cirencester and Eynsham. The collection can be browsed or searched (remember that the text is in Latin when picking keywords!), and for each charter there is normally a link to a scan of the published version (which may include an abstract in English). The interface takes a bit of getting used to – and the server seems to be a little temperamental – but there’s a huge amount of information behind it. “

Quoted from
http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/updates/update.shtml